Power of ERDC

U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC)

Satisfy your curiosity and learn how some of our country’s smartest engineers and scientists are solving many of the toughest challenges facing the nation and the Warfighter. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is comprised of seven research laboratories across four states, and one of its greatest strengths is its ability to combine the expertise from multiple laboratories into powerful, cross-disciplinary projects. Each month, we dive into one of these complex problems across its broad civil works and military mission space and ask ERDC’s world-class researchers about how they are discovering, developing and delivering practical cutting-edge solutions that make the world safer and better. read less
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Episódios

#28: Advanced manufacturing: Using 3D printing, new materials and optimized designs to produce large-scale components
01-05-2024
#28: Advanced manufacturing: Using 3D printing, new materials and optimized designs to produce large-scale components
As America’s civil works infrastructure facilities age beyond their initial design lives, so do the thousands of individual components that keep them functioning. These original components were often fabricated using vintage material and manufacturing methods, making them costly, burdensome and time-consuming to replicate. However, if one of these parts were to suddenly break, that failure could shut down a facility for months, causing significant national economic damage. Faced with this challenge, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is studying how innovative techniques, such as additive manufacturing (large-scale 3D printing), advanced materials and design optimization can be used to replace vintage infrastructure components faster and at a lower cost while maintaining, and even improving, their properties. This research resulted in a recent collaboration with the USACE Detroit District and Lincoln Electric to manufacture the largest U.S. civil works infrastructure component produced by a 3D printer – a 12-foot-long, 6,000-pound metal part for the ship arrestor system on the Poe Lock, one of two active locks on the Soo Locks facility. We discuss ERDC’s advanced manufacturing research with Dr. Robert Moser and Dr. Zack McClelland from ERDC’s Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory. Moser is a Senior Scientific Technical Manager for Materials, Manufacturing and Structures, and McClelland is a research mechanical engineer. We talk about the existing state of aging infrastructure and the role additive manufacturing can play to meet this challenge (3:49), how ERDC became involved in 3D printing and how that capability has evolved (7:09), ERDC’s focus areas for advanced manufacturing R&D (11:36), and the project to manufacture the largest U.S. civil works infrastructure component produced by a 3D printer (18:40). We also discuss how ERDC is working to overcome some of the challenges of 3D-printing large infrastructure components (25:27), how ERDC’s high-performance computing capability boosts this effort (28:49), how it has benefitted from military research (39:02) and what the future holds (49:11). For more information on the Power of ERDC podcast, visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org.
#27: RAIL: Making it easier to transport armored vehicles to austere locations
30-10-2023
#27: RAIL: Making it easier to transport armored vehicles to austere locations
Despite modern transportation advancements, rail remains a superior method for moving heavy military equipment over vast inland distances. However, transporting tanks by train requires railyard facilities with specialized equipment capable of moving the armored vehicles onto and off of the rail cars. In response, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) developed the Rapidly Available Interface for trans-Loading (RAIL), a transportable ramp system that allows military vehicles to be onloaded or offloaded anywhere along a rail line. A collaboration between ERDC and the Combat Capabilities Development Command Ground Vehicle Systems Center (GVSC), RAIL will provide greater operational flexibility to quickly transport armored vehicles where they are most needed. We talk about RAIL with Justin Strickler, chief of the Engineering Systems and Materials Division at ERDC’s Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory. Topics discussed include the importance of trains to a modernized U.S. force (3:29) and how RAIL can improve current practice for loading and off-loading heavy armored vehicles (4:48) and enable more agile power projection for U.S. and Allied Forces (8:16). We also discuss the system’s versatility (16:50), how it was developed in collaboration with GVSC (21:12) by rapidly adapting technology for offloading battle tanks at damaged seaport facilities (11:18), and how the effort has leveraged ERDC’s deep expertise in force projection (30:32). For more information on RAIL, contact Strickler at Justin.S.Strickler (at) usace.army.mil. For more information on the Power of ERDC podcast, visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org.
#26: Sand Boil Filter: A more efficient tool to combat internal levee erosion
02-08-2023
#26: Sand Boil Filter: A more efficient tool to combat internal levee erosion
When river levels rise, so does the threat of sand boils, which occur when water bubbles out of the ground near the base of a levee, surrounded by a mound of displaced soil. Caused by increased pressure, sand boils are a visible sign of erosion within a levee. And unless they are treated immediately, these sand boils will grow and more sediment will be displaced, escalating the risk of a catastrophic breach. However, the current method for fighting sand boils is difficult, expensive and dangerous, requiring hundreds of sandbags. To simplify this cumbersome process, ERDC researchers have developed a special lightweight filter that can be inserted into a sand boil to alleviate the pressure and stop the erosion. A single person could install it in about 15 minutes, allowing personnel to alleviate multiple sand boils more safely and efficiently – providing greater protection to our nation’s critical levee systems and the lives and livelihoods they defend. We discuss these Sand Boil Filter kits with Samantha Lucker, a research geologist with ERDC’s Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory. We talk about why sand boils must be promptly addressed (5:04), and how ERDC’s new filters will improve on the current process (7:56) and enable better levee management (9:04). We also discuss how this effort started (17:00), how it builds on ERDC’s deep expertise in studying the Mississippi River (22:54), and how researchers are improving the filter’s design (21:00) to increase its usage (25:23). For more information on these Sand Boil Filter kits, contact Lucker at Samantha.L.Lucker (at) usace.army.mil. For more information on the Power of ERDC podcast, visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org.
#26: Sand Boil Filter: A more efficient tool to combat internal levee erosion
02-08-2023
#26: Sand Boil Filter: A more efficient tool to combat internal levee erosion
When river levels rise, so does the threat of sand boils, which occur when water bubbles out of the ground near the base of a levee, surrounded by a mound of displaced soil. Caused by increased pressure, sand boils are a visible sign of erosion within a levee. And unless they are treated immediately, these sand boils will grow and more sediment will be displaced, escalating the risk of a catastrophic breach. However, the current method for fighting sand boils is difficult, expensive and dangerous, requiring hundreds of sandbags. To simplify this cumbersome process, ERDC researchers have developed a special lightweight filter that can be inserted into a sand boil to alleviate the pressure and stop the erosion. A single person could install it in about 15 minutes, allowing personnel to alleviate multiple sand boils more safely and efficiently – providing greater protection to our nation’s critical levee systems and the lives and livelihoods they defend. We discuss these Sand Boil Filter kits with Samantha Lucker, a research geologist with ERDC’s Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory. We talk about why sand boils must be promptly addressed (5:04), and how ERDC’s new filters will improve on the current process (7:56) and enable better levee management (9:04). We also discuss how this effort started (17:00), how it builds on ERDC’s deep expertise in studying the Mississippi River (22:54), and how researchers are improving the filter’s design (21:00) to increase its usage (25:23). For more information on these Sand Boil Filter kits, contact Lucker at Samantha.L.Lucker (at) usace.army.mil. For more information on the Power of ERDC podcast, visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org.
#25: CorpsCam: Enabling more proactive coastal management through real-time monitoring and data
30-06-2023
#25: CorpsCam: Enabling more proactive coastal management through real-time monitoring and data
Monitoring large and constantly changing coastlines can be expensive, time consuming and dangerous. Traditional surveying methods are also limited because they only provide a single snapshot in time and don’t capture the full picture. As a result, coastal managers don’t always have the information they need to understand dynamic coastal conditions and plan projects that preserve our nation’s coasts, protect the environment, and support the economy. To overcome this knowledge gap, ERDC launched CorpsCam, which uses remote video technology to better monitor federal beach and other coastal projects. CorpsCam can rapidly analyze a variety of images, from cellphone pictures uploaded by citizen scientists to scientific-grade video captured by high-end cameras, to provide hourly data on beach state, erosion rates, bathymetry, wave parameters and more. It is enabling better project designs and more proactive coastal management. Joining us to talk about CorpsCam are Dr. Brittany Bruder, Dr. Ian Conery and Sean McGill from ERDC’s Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL). Bruder is a research coastal engineer based at CHL’s Field Research Facility (FRF) on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, and Conery is a research oceanographer based at the FRF. McGill is a research physical scientist at CHL’s Vicksburg location. Topics include what CorpsCam is and how it can improve coastal resilience (4:06), how it got started (18:50), and the types of locations the effort is targeting (12:48). We also talk about ERDC’s Field Research Facility and its capabilities (22:21) and growing military portfolio (26:36). And we discuss past CorpsCam projects (28:11) and what lies ahead for this effort (39:06). For more information on CorpsCam, visit https://coastalimaging.erdc.dren.mil/CorpsCam or email Bruder at Brittany.L.Bruder (at) usace.army.mil. For more information on the Power of ERDC podcast, visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org.
#25: CorpsCam: Enabling more proactive coastal management through real-time monitoring and data
30-06-2023
#25: CorpsCam: Enabling more proactive coastal management through real-time monitoring and data
Monitoring large and constantly changing coastlines can be expensive, time consuming and dangerous. Traditional surveying methods are also limited because they only provide a single snapshot in time and don’t capture the full picture. As a result, coastal managers don’t always have the information they need to understand dynamic coastal conditions and plan projects that preserve our nation’s coasts, protect the environment, and support the economy. To overcome this knowledge gap, ERDC launched CorpsCam, which uses remote video technology to better monitor federal beach and other coastal projects. CorpsCam can rapidly analyze a variety of images, from cellphone pictures uploaded by citizen scientists to scientific-grade video captured by high-end cameras, to provide hourly data on beach state, erosion rates, bathymetry, wave parameters and more. It is enabling better project designs and more proactive coastal management. Joining us to talk about CorpsCam are Dr. Brittany Bruder, Dr. Ian Conery and Sean McGill from ERDC’s Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL). Bruder is a researcher coastal engineer based at CHL’s Field Research Facility (FRF) on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, and Conery is a research oceanographer based at the FRF. McGill is a research physical scientist at CHL’s Vicksburg location. Topics include what CorpsCam is and how it can improve coastal resilience (4:06), how it got started (18:50), and the types of locations the effort is targeting (12:48). We also talk about ERDC’s Field Research Facility and its capabilities (22:21) and growing military portfolio (26:36). And we discuss past CorpsCam projects (28:11) and what lies ahead for this effort (39:06). For more information on CorpsCam, visit https://coastalimaging.erdc.dren.mil/CorpsCam or email Bruder at Brittany.L.Bruder (at) usace.army.mil. For more information on the Power of ERDC podcast, visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org.
#23: Arctic Mobility
26-04-2023
#23: Arctic Mobility
We talk with Dr. Orian Welling and Mr. Michael Parker from ERDC’s Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory about how ERDC’s cold weather mobility expertise will directly help the U.S. military better protect and defend the Arctic. As the Arctic grows in strategic importance to the United States, the region also presents unique challenges to military mobility. Heavy duty tires designed for rugged terrains don’t handle as well on cold, slick surfaces. And ice and snow aren’t the only challenges facing military vehicles in Arctic environments. In fact, mobility becomes even more difficult during the spring months when frozen ground begins to thaw, and the terrain is transformed into a muddy, swampy quagmire. ERDC’s research is enabling better cold weather tires and leading to robust cross-country mobility models that can forecast ice thickness, snow depth and thaw, and predict which vehicles can perform where in Arctic conditions. ERDC is also providing knowledge and developing algorithms and systems that will allow autonomous manned and unmanned systems to navigate in cold regions. We talk with Orian and Mike about how their unique backgrounds contribute to this research (6:41, 30:16), why the Army needs to study Arctic mobility (4:13), the unique challenges of the spring thaw (34:47), and how the expertise of CRREL’s mobility team (8:57) and the laboratory’s world-class specialized facilities (11:27) enable this capability. We also discuss specific projects, such as work on winter tires (16:54), mobility models (25:56) and cold weather autonomy (21:21). And we talk about how the effort benefits from ERDC’s cross-disciplinary research (38:07), as well as from partnerships and international collaboration (40:34). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#23: Arctic Mobility
25-04-2023
#23: Arctic Mobility
We talk with Dr. Orian Welling and Mr. Michael Parker from ERDC’s Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory about how ERDC’s cold weather mobility expertise will directly help the U.S. military better protect and defend the Arctic. As the Arctic grows in strategic importance to the United States, the region also presents unique challenges to military mobility. Heavy duty tires designed for rugged terrains don’t handle as well on cold, slick surfaces. And ice and snow aren’t the only challenges facing military vehicles in Arctic environments. In fact, mobility becomes even more difficult during the spring months when frozen ground begins to thaw, and the terrain is transformed into a muddy, swampy quagmire. ERDC’s research is enabling better cold weather tires and leading to robust cross-country mobility models that can forecast ice thickness, snow depth and thaw, and predict which vehicles can perform where in Arctic conditions. ERDC is also providing knowledge and developing algorithms and systems that will allow autonomous manned and unmanned systems to navigate in cold regions. We talk with Orian and Mike about how their unique backgrounds contribute to this research (6:41, 30:16), why the Army needs to study Arctic mobility (4:13), the unique challenges of the spring thaw (34:47), and how the expertise of CRREL’s mobility team (8:57) and the laboratory’s world-class specialized facilities (11:27) enable this capability. We also discuss specific projects, such as work on winter tires (16:54), mobility models (25:56) and cold weather autonomy (21:21). And we talk about how the effort benefits from ERDC’s cross-disciplinary research (38:07), as well as from partnerships and international collaboration (40:34). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#21: Enhanced Terrain Processing
14-10-2022
#21: Enhanced Terrain Processing
Soldiers are often forced to operate using outdated geospatial data that may not accurately represent current ground conditions. This creates challenges when trying to find the best possible routes for troop maneuvers or when selecting helicopter landing zones. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is developing a series of tools to solve this problem. These tools enable Army geospatial engineers to rapidly process new remotely sensed imagery from a variety of sources and use it to analyze current terrain conditions. Processes that once took hours can now be completed in seconds or minutes, and with higher accuracy, giving the Warfighter superior situational awareness and knowledge of the operational environment. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we discuss this project with Nikki Wayant, research geographer at ERDC’s Geospatial Research Laboratory and task lead for the Enhanced Terrain Processing effort. We discuss the challenges caused by outdated geospatial data (3:17), the wide range of tools and terrain analysis products available through the Enhanced Terrain Processing effort (14:55), how these tools allow data to be combined in new ways (18:37, 23:32) and how they enable mission success (12:48). We also talk about the relationship with the Army Geospatial Center’s Military Support Team and how it enables better products (20:23), when the tools will be available to Soldiers (20:06), how the effort has evolved through machine learning (30:16), and what the future holds for it (31:58). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#21: Enhanced Terrain Processing
14-10-2022
#21: Enhanced Terrain Processing
Soldiers are often forced to operate using outdated geospatial data that may not accurately represent current ground conditions. This creates challenges when trying to find the best possible routes for troop maneuvers or when selecting helicopter landing zones. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is developing a series of tools to solve this problem. These tools enable Army geospatial engineers to rapidly process new remotely sensed imagery from a variety of sources and use it to analyze current terrain conditions. Processes that once took hours can now be completed in seconds or minutes, and with higher accuracy, giving the Warfighter superior situational awareness and knowledge of the operational environment. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we discuss this project with Nikki Wayant, research geographer at ERDC’s Geospatial Research Laboratory and task lead for the Enhanced Terrain Processing effort. We discuss the challenges caused by outdated geospatial data (3:17), the wide range of tools and terrain analysis products available through the Enhanced Terrain Processing effort (14:55), how these tools allow data to be combined in new ways (18:37, 23:32) and how they enable mission success (12:48). We also talk about the relationship with the Army Geospatial Center’s Military Support Team and how it enables better products (20:23), when the tools will be available to Soldiers (20:06), how the effort has evolved through machine learning (30:16), and what the future holds for it (31:58). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#20: Operational Energy
20-09-2022
#20: Operational Energy
Military operations require large amounts of energy to train, move and sustain forces, as well as to power weapons platforms – and this is known as operational energy. Given the high human toll and financial cost of supplying this energy to frontline forces, new strategies are seeking to electrify the battlefield and reduce the reliance on fossil fuels. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is on the leading edge of efforts to find new ways to power U.S. forces, including innovations in energy storage and power management. By reducing the reliance on fuel resupply, ERDC’s work will save lives and money and will give units more flexibility to extend their operational reach and increase freedom of maneuver, enabling more successful Multi-Domain Operations. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we discuss these efforts with Tom Decker, operational energy program manager at ERDC’s Construction Engineering Research Laboratory. We talk about why operational energy is an ERDC priority (4:06), the electrified battlefield concept (4:31), how ERDC’s effort benefits from both the organization’s history (13:10) and Decker’s military background (11:12), and how these efforts have a broader impact than the U.S. Military (19:25, 26:17). We also discuss several ERDC initiatives in this area, including providing data that enables better-informed energy decisions (14:10), hybrid systems that allow tactical generators to provide more power with less fuel (17:46), and a flow battery can energize critical parts of an installation when needed (20:49). And we explore what lies in the art of the possible in terms of operational energy (29:27) and how this effort fits into Multi-Domain Operations and Army modernization concepts (31:03). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#20: Operational Energy
20-09-2022
#20: Operational Energy
Military operations require large amounts of energy to train, move and sustain forces, as well as to power weapons platforms – and this is known as operational energy. Given the high human toll and financial cost of supplying this energy to frontline forces, new strategies are seeking to electrify the battlefield and reduce the reliance on fossil fuels. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is on the leading edge of efforts to find new ways to power U.S. forces, including innovations in energy storage and power management. By reducing the reliance on fuel resupply, ERDC’s work will save lives and money and will give units more flexibility to extend their operational reach and increase freedom of maneuver, enabling more successful Multi-Domain Operations. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we discuss these efforts with Tom Decker, operational energy program manager at ERDC’s Construction Engineering Research Laboratory. We talk about why operational energy is an ERDC priority (4:06), the electrified battlefield concept (4:31), how ERDC’s effort benefits from both the organization’s history (13:10) and Decker’s military background (11:12), and how these efforts have a broader impact than the U.S. Military (19:25, 26:17). We also discuss several ERDC initiatives in this area, including providing data that enables better-informed energy decisions (14:10), hybrid systems that allow tactical generators to provide more power with less fuel (17:46), and a flow battery can energize critical parts of an installation when needed (20:49). And we explore what lies in the art of the possible in terms of operational energy (29:27) and how this effort fits into Multi-Domain Operations and Army modernization concepts (31:03). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#19: Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations
16-08-2022
#19: Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations
Managing a reservoir is a delicate balancing act. If you keep too much water, there may not be enough storage capacity when heavy rains hit, increasing the risk for catastrophic flooding. If you release too much water, there won’t be enough to supply nearby residents who depend upon the reservoir for their survival. For decades, this process has been guided by water control manuals that dictate when to retain and when to release based on ground conditions. But a new research and operations partnership called Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations (FIRO) uses modern weather and streamflow forecasting to better inform water management decisions. As climate change threatens to bring more extreme floods and droughts, FIRO allows water managers to be as precise and efficient as possible in carefully balancing flood risk management, water supply and environmental needs. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we talk with two leaders of the FIRO effort – Dr. Cary Talbot and Dr. Marty Ralph. Talbot is a division chief at ERDC’s Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory and FIRO program manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Ralph is director of the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at the University of California San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography. We talk about atmospheric rivers (4:19) and how better water management in the West depends on better understanding these unique storms (8:00), how the FIRO effort has improved weather forecasting skill in the West (6:53) and the nation (11:11), and how these improved forecasts will enable better water management (18:11). We also discuss how ERDC came to be involved in FIRO (13:01), how the effort has been strengthened by its many partnerships (19:42), and efforts to expand this methodology throughout the nation (31:03). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#19: Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations
16-08-2022
#19: Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations
Managing a reservoir is a delicate balancing act. If you keep too much water, there may not be enough storage capacity when heavy rains hit, increasing the risk for catastrophic flooding. If you release too much water, there won’t be enough to supply nearby residents who depend upon the reservoir for their survival. For decades, this process has been guided by water control manuals that dictate when to retain and when to release based on ground conditions. But a new research and operations partnership called Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations (FIRO) uses modern weather and streamflow forecasting to better inform water management decisions. As climate change threatens to bring more extreme floods and droughts, FIRO allows water managers to be as precise and efficient as possible in carefully balancing flood risk management, water supply and environmental needs. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we talk with two leaders of the FIRO effort – Dr. Cary Talbot and Dr. Marty Ralph. Talbot is a division chief at ERDC’s Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory and FIRO program manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Ralph is director of the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes at the University of California San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography. We talk about atmospheric rivers (4:19) and how better water management in the West depends on better understanding these unique storms (8:00), how the FIRO effort has improved weather forecasting skill in the West (6:53) and the nation (11:11), and how these improved forecasts will enable better water management (18:11). We also discuss how ERDC came to be involved in FIRO (13:01), how the effort has been strengthened by its many partnerships (19:42), and efforts to expand this methodology throughout the nation (31:03). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information.
#18: SandSnap
27-06-2022
#18: SandSnap
Knowing the size of sand grains on the nation’s beaches is important to many coastal management efforts. However, getting that information is labor intensive, and no nationwide database of sand grain size currently exists. To fill this void, ERDC has launched SandSnap, a collaborative effort to engage citizen scientists in a project that will build that database and directly make our coastlines more resilient to the effects of storms and changing climates. Participants are asked to take a photo of the sand on their next beach trip, with a U.S. coin placed in the photo as a point of reference. Those photos can be uploaded to https://sandsnap-erdcchl.hub.arcgis.com, where a deep learning neural network will analyze the grain size to begin building the database. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we talk with Dr. Brian McFall, research coastal engineer at ERDC’s Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory and lead for the SandSnap program. We discuss what SandSnap is and why it matters (3:13), why people should take the time to upload a SandSnap and how their effort will benefit our beaches and our planet (4:46), how SandSnap can make us more resilient to future hurricanes (11:03), the process to take and upload a SandSnap (14:26), the partners that are contributing to this effort (35:07), and how it is energizing a future generation of engineers and scientists (22:52). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information. Visit https://sandsnap-erdcchl.hub.arcgis.com to upload your SandSnap.
#18: SandSnap
27-06-2022
#18: SandSnap
Knowing the size of sand grains on the nation’s beaches is important to many coastal management efforts. However, getting that information is labor intensive, and no nationwide database of sand grain size currently exists. To fill this void, ERDC has launched SandSnap, a collaborative effort to engage citizen scientists in a project that will build that database and directly make our coastlines more resilient to the effects of storms and changing climates. Participants are asked to take a photo of the sand on their next beach trip, with a U.S. coin placed in the photo as a point of reference. Those photos can be uploaded to https://sandsnap-erdcchl.hub.arcgis.com, where a deep learning neural network will analyze the grain size to begin building the database. On the latest episode of the Power of ERDC podcast, we talk with Dr. Brian McFall, research coastal engineer at ERDC’s Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory and lead for the SandSnap program. We discuss what SandSnap is and why it matters (3:13), why people should take the time to upload a SandSnap and how their effort will benefit our beaches and our planet (4:46), how SandSnap can make us more resilient to future hurricanes (11:03), the process to take and upload a SandSnap (14:26), the partners that are contributing to this effort (35:07), and how it is energizing a future generation of engineers and scientists (22:52). Visit https://www.PowerofERDCPodcast.org for more information. Visit https://sandsnap-erdcchl.hub.arcgis.com to upload your SandSnap.